Response to Wallace Article in Friends Journal

{jcomments lock} Terry Wallace, in his article,”Misunderstanding Quaker Faith and Practice ” in Friends Journal, tried to correct what he sees as limitations of the unprogrammed Friends tradition, but I think he instead displayed a misunderstanding of the unprogrammed tradition, its opposition to creeds, its use of the Bible, and many other things.

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Columbia Meeting for Worship Each First Day

Meetings are now at the new meeting house at 120 Pisgah Church Road.    From I-20 on the north side of Columbia; go north on Farrow Road (the exit just west of 277 exit); turn left on Pisgah Church Rd. The meeting house is on the right.
This is the building you will be looking for:
10:00am –
11:00am
120 Pisgah Church Road

11:00am –
11:30am
An informal time for conversation and fellowship over tea or coffee
11:30am –
12:30pm
A presentation and discussion on a variety of religious and social topics

Hurl Rock Park

John and William Bertram were early travelers in the Southeast and in South Carolina. They named Hurl Rock, where Hurl Rock Park is now located on 21st Avenue South at Ocean Boulevard in Myrtle Beach. This is an unusual outcropping of black rock in an otherwise sandy county. A plaque commemorating the Bartrams stands in the parking lot.

Richard Bertram, the grandfather of John, had come to America with William Penn at the close of the 17th Century. These adventurous naturalists had Quaker roots, but were read out of meeting (excommunicated) in 1755 due to their "Independent religious views." Bartram's Gardens, an arboretum in Philadelphia on Elmwood Avenue West of 54th Street still remains, displaying many unique plant specimens collected on the tours this father and son team made into our region.

More on Bartram's Travels to NC and SC

Bartram's Garderns in Philadelphia

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Wateree Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends

This meeting was laid down (disbanded) many years ago, but is of historic significance.

Camden, South Carolina was the sight of the Wateree Meeting and has a Quaker cemetery. A marker in the cemetery shows the location of the meeting house. There are a number of Quaker graves, nameless in the early tradition of Friends.

Camden's legend of the Catawba chief Haiglar who helped the Quaker settlers in 1753, is commemorated with a life-sized weather vane. The original is housed in the Camden Archives and Museum at 1314 Broad Street, (803)-425-6050, and a replica stands atop a store on Broad Street. The Archives is a popular stop for genealogical researchers.

 

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